Spiced Paleo Protein Pumpkin Pot August 04 2016

Here’s how you can make your very own Spiced Paleo Protein Pumpkin Pot Recipe for the festive fall:

 

Duration: 6 – 8
Serves: 30 mins

 

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Stevia

  • 4 cups ground nuts

  • 1/3 cup almond milk

  • 400ml pumpkin puree

  • 4 high quality gelatin leaves

  • 2 scoops of vanilla protein powder of your choice

  • 3 tsps pumpkin spice blend

  • 1 cup vanilla coconut yoghurt

 

Pumpkin Spice Blend

  • 3 tablespoons ground cinnamon,

  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger,

  • 2 teaspoons ground nutmeg,

  • 1 ½ teaspoons ground allspice

  • 1 ½ teaspoons ground cloves.

 

Method

  1.  In your food processor place ¼ cup stevia, 4 cups almond flour, 1/3 cup almond milk and blend together. Unlike normal pastry you shouldn’t try to roll this out.

  2. Take some of the mix (again not too sloppy but slightly sticky) and press into your pie moulds evenly.

  3. Cook for 15 mins on 180 degrees.

  4. In a bowl mix 1 jar of pumpkin puree, 3 tsps of  pumpkin pie spice blend, add 2 scoops of vanilla protein.

  5. Add 4 melted leaves of gelatine to help it set.

  6. Spoon the pumpkin mix onto the shortbread pastry.

  7. Leave it to set in the fridge.

  8. For the topping you need 1 cup of vanilla coconut yoghurt and mix.

  9. Spoon the mix onto the pumpkin and then sprinkle a little of the pumpkin spice for decoration.

 

 

 

Author: Emma Kirke

Founder & MD of Dr Emma Kirke Consultant Osteomylogist

She uses a multi-discipline approach to treatment and aims to not just treat the symptoms but to find the cause. A typical first appointment involves taking a full medical history and carrying out a posture assessment with specific attention to the presenting symptoms.

A first consultation can last 45 to 60 minutes with follow-up treatments lasting about 30 minutes.

Emma is currently treating Super League rugby players fromBradford Bulls, Wakefield Wildcats and Leeds Rhinos. She also treats local British Superbike competitor Tom Tunstall, England under 21's sprint and hurdle team, England under 21's Indoor Bowls team and some disabled national-level athletes. Around 90% of Emma's patients come via personal recommendations and she also works with other medical specialists.

Her current patient list ranges from babies through to elderly patients in their 90's, all with various types of conditions and injuries. Emma has enjoyed much success with various treatments on young people and she regularly gives presentations on injury prevention and various other treatments.